Archives for posts with tag: sight and sound

Just as we put finishing touches to a succession of films, including Vladimir and WilliamLa Belle NoiseThe Benefit of Doubt and This is Cinema, and just before we undertake editing of The New Hope 2, we are delighted to say that #randomaccessmemory has been listed among the best video essays of 2018 in the prestigious Sight & Sound magazine.

Listed alongside work by filmmakers including Jean-Luc Godard and Lars von Trier, as well as among video-essay luminaries such as Kevin B Lee, Catherine Grant, Cristina Álvarez López, Adrian Martin and others, we are delighted that #randomaccessmemory gets a mention.

You have to scroll pretty far down (well, to the bottom) of the article to see where Michael Witt has named the film…. but it is there indeed.

s&s image

From Sight & Sound‘s website

If you want to watch #randomaccessmemory, you can do so here (or watch it directly at the foot of this entry).

With regard to the film itself, #randomaccessmemory is an experimental feature that uses all of the smartphone footage that William Brown shot in 2016 in order to offer up an investigation into love.

Filmed in the UK, France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Macedonia, Lithuania, Brazil and the USA, #randomaccessmemory looks at art, landscape, moving images and nature to try to understand love.

Loosely based on Homer’s Odyssey (culminating in Ithaca, no less), the film also draws upon the work of authors as diverse as Antonin Artaud, André Breton, Miguel de Cervantes, Luce Irigaray, Molière, William Shakespeare, Sophocles, Oscar Wilde and Virginia Woolf in order to make its argument about the truth of love.

Featuring music from the wonderfully talented Anna Eichenauer and Alex Fixsen, #randomaccessmemory also makes visual references to filmmakers as diverse as John Akomfrah, Hito Steyerl, Kidlat Tahimik, Harun Farocki, Lav Diaz and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, while also referencing other artists like Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso and Tacita Dean.

 

 

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Esteemed film critic and academic Catherine Wheatley has mentioned Afterimages among her Films of the Year 2010, alongside work by Gaspar Noé, Lucrecia Martel and Catherine Breillat.

If you want to look at Wheatley’s list, click here.

Wheatley says that she would take films like Afterimages “over the likes of the overblown and overrated I Am Love any day of the week.” We are honoured.

Jonathan Rosenbaum, the critic whom Jean-Luc Godard described as the most important writer on film since André Bazin, has included En Attendant Godard among his Top Five Films of 2009 in Sight & Sound magazine.

Rosenbaum describes the film thus:

This nervy, brand new feature is an excellent work of Godard criticism (with glancing look-ins at Resnais, Haneke and Cassavetes) that goes beyond detailed pastiche to forge a creative application of 1960s and early ’70s Godard across a tour through portions of western Europe. An inquiry, in short, into how Godard’s example might inform and apply to contemporary film-making.

To read the full poll, click here.