Archives for posts with tag: the new hope

Apologies for the relative silence on the Beg Steal Borrow front.

However, we are delighted to mention various screenings that have recently taken place featuring Beg Steal Borrow movies.

Firstly, The Benefit of Doubt screened at B-Film at the University of Birmingham on 12 January, before Selfie screened on 23 February at Coventry University – where there was a large and lively audience.

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Selfie screens at Coventry University.

Then The New Hope screened on Sunday 25 February at the Countdown Theater in Brooklyn, New York, as part of the Bad Film Fest – as well as at the University of Roehampton, London, on 29 March.

Bad Film Fest

Finally, Circle/Line screened at the University of St Andrews on 11 April, while Sculptures of London will enjoy a screening at the University of Bedfordshire in Luton on 10 May.

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Circle/Line screens at the Byre Theatre in St Andrews, Scotland.

Many thanks to all those who have shown and who continue to show support for our endeavours.

This is Cinema is coming along slowly but surely, and we hope that there are more similar screenings soon.

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The Straight Jacket Guerrilla Film Festival is this week showing four – yes, four! – Beg Steal Borrow films as part of its programme.

Straight Jacket

The Straight Jacket Guerrilla Film Festival.

The online festival, which specialises in underground, cult and experimental cinema, runs for a week, with a Beg Steal Borrow film playing on each of the festival’s first four days.

The running order sees our punk Don Quixote meets Star Wars film The New Hope playing on Tuesday 15 August.

A manifesto for the film can be read here: The New Hope – A Manifesto.

The New Hope is followed on Wednesday 16 August by Roehampton Guerrillas (2011-2016), a compilation of short films made by the titular group of guerrilla filmmakers and curated by William Brown.

Then our art house zombie homage to the Lumière brothers, Ur: The End of Civilization in 90 Tableaux, plays on Thursday 17 August.

And finally on Friday 18 August, the festival is showing Selfie, an essay-film about selfie culture comprised uniquely of moving-image selfies featuring William Brown.

We are completely delighted to be featuring so prominently as part of the festival, which is run by guerrilla filmmakers extraordinaire Fabrizio Federico and Laura Grace Robles.

The festival will culminate on Saturday 21 August with an awards ceremony at the Alamo Street Eat Bar in San Antonio,Texas. The ceremony runs from 9pm to midnight, with the Beg Steal Borrow films competing for Most Creative Feature Film. Let’s keep our fingers crossed!

Tune in to the Straight Jacket website in order to watch the films.

And click here to read an interview with William Brown about guerrilla filmmaking.

The Straight Jacket screenings come ahead of the World Premiere of Letters to Ariadne at the Validate Yourself Film Festival in New York on Saturday 2 September – and follow hot on the heels of the World Premiere of Circle/Line at London’s East End Film Festival in June.

In the meantime, we have also enjoyed preview screenings of The Benefit of Doubt at the Roxy Bar & Grill in London on 17 June and of Sculptures of London at the Film-Philosophy Conference at the University of Lancaster on 4 July.

We have also very nearly finished all filming for This is Cinema, the principle shoot of which lasted between 10 and 23 July.

So… all in all a busy summer for Beg Steal Borrow. Let us hope that we have more screenings in the near future. But in the meantime… please support our work by checking out our films!

We are thrilled to announce that we have reached the £3,000 target for our crowd fund campaign with LiveTree for This is Cinema.

With three days left on the campaign, though, any extra money raised will certainly help the production – while also seeing money donated to Tender, the arts charity that works with young people to prevent domestic abuse and sexual violence.

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The campaign for this This is Cinema  comes at the same time as we shoot Sculptures of London, and just ahead of the world premiere of Circle/Line at the East End Film Festival. This screening takes place at 5pm on Saturday 3 June at Old Spitalfields Market – and the screening is free!

The successful completion of the crowd funding campaign also comes as the finishing touches are being put to The Benefit of Doubt, with William Brown also working on an essay-film called #randomaccessmemory and an untitled letter-film with Vladimir Najdovski, a filmmaker based in Skopje, Macedonia.

Finally, it looks as though there are forthcoming festival screenings for The New HopeUr: The End of Civilization in 90 TableauxRoehampton Guerrillas (2011-2016) and Letters to Ariadne – about which more announcements will be made soon.

So stay tuned for more news from Beg Steal Borrow!

 

Our campaign to raise money for This is Cinema may be in full flow – having surpassed the 50 per cent mark, with £1,305 left to raise in 18 days – but there is no rest for the wicked as cinematographer Tom Maine and I headed out on 15 May 2017 to start work on a new short essay-film, Sculptures of London.

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Tom Maine shoots some sculptures in Knightsbridge.

Sculptures of London offers the collective image that the city’s sculptures paint when we put them all alongside each other in a film. What is the story of the city and its people that the the city’s sculptures tell?

Sculptures Map

A map showing the locations of all of the different sculptures that we are going to shoot for Sculptures of London.

Having gone through thousands of sculptures in preparing for this film, we have narrowed the film shoot down to images of about 200 different pieces of work – dotted all over London. And so yesterday, we had our first day of filming, starting over in Southall Park, where we shot Rachel Silver’s Sculptural Mosaic Globe.

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Rachel Silver’s Sculptural Mosaic Globe in Southall Park.

We then headed to the Hammersmith and Shepherds Bush area, where, among other things, we were saddened to see the Elliott Brook’s Goaloids had been removed from Shepherds Bush Green. We shall research what has happened to this sculpture!

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George Frederick Watts’ Physical Energy.

We then did a stint in Kensington Gardens, looking in particular at George Frederick Watts’ Physical Energy and Henry Moore’s Arch – two sculptures that already feature prominently in Beg Steal Borrow’s The New Hope (in which Dennis attacks Physical Energy, mistaking it for a rancor).

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Henry Moore’s Arch from across the Serpentine.

We then headed to Sloane Square, where we filmed some of the work in and around Belgrave Square and Cadogan Gardens. In the latter square, David Wynne’s Dancers and Girl with Doves sit in private gardens.

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David Wynne’s Dancers in their private garden.

This begs the question about whether this art is public or not, since one can see it from the public space of the pavement, but one cannot approach it to see it in detail unless one is with a local resident.

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Simon Gudgeon’s Search for Englightenment.

We then got in some shots of Jacob Epstein’s Rush of Green and Simon Gudgeon’s Search for Enlightenment at One Hyde Park, before heading around the park to Still Water by Nic Fiddian-Green, the horse’s head that stands near Marble Arch.

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Still Water by Nic Fiddian-Green.

Finally, we headed to Edgware Road and Paddington, where we got reacquainted with Allan Sly’s Window Cleaner, a sculpture that also features in Circle/Line, which you can see at its premiere at the East End Film Festival on 3 June 2017 at 5pm at Old Spitalfields Market.

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Standing Man and Walking Man by Sean Henry.

We then ended with a trip to see Paddington Bear himself inside the station – but not before going to see Sean Henry’s Standing Man and Walking Man by Sheldon Square.

We were sad to see that Jon Buck’s Family had also been removed. Perhaps the way in which sculptures can go walkabouts will merit another film at a later point in time!

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Paddington!

But we shall keep you updated with this and other projects as we make them. Please do support Beg Steal Borrow’s efforts to make different and strange films…!

After a successful first preview screening at the Whirled Cinema in Brixton in July, we are delighted to announce a second preview screening of Circle/Line at renowned visual effects house Double Negative.

We are also pleased to say that the screening sold out shortly after tickets became available – hopefully a sign both of how the first screening was well received and of how people are interested in seeing a film about happiness in contemporary London.

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The DNeg screening has kindly been made possible by Garry Madison, a senior colourist at the company, and who has worked on such prominent films as The Dark Knight RisesInterstellarEx Machina and Paddington.

Garry saw Circle/Line at the Whirled and was sufficiently impressed to propose the second preview screening, which takes place at 6.30pm on Thursday 29 September. Places may become available at the last minute, so if you’d like to join a waiting list, please contact us.

The Circle/Line preview screening is just one of a few screenings of Beg Steal Borrow films set to take place over the next few weeks: Circle/Line will have a private screening at the University of Skövde in Sweden, with Selfie enjoying a forthcoming screening at the University of Roehampton, The New Hope playing at the University of Central Lancashire, and En Attendant Godard due for a screening in Curitiba, Brazil, in October.

More information will follow about these screenings when details have been confirmed.

About Circle/Line

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Are you happy?

This is the question that we ask people outside or near the stations of London Underground’s Circle Line.

Circle/Line is, then, a documentary comprised of vox pop interviews with ‘everyday’ people – from the homeless to the hopeful, from the ambitious to the activist, from task-driven Londoners to tourists.

Inspired by Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin’s classic documentary, Chronique d’un été/Chronicle of a Summer (France, 1961), Circle/Line is nonetheless an original work and a fascinating insight into the lives of people in contemporary London.

Shot by Beg Steal Borrow regular Tom Maine, the film is both a portrait not just of people, but also of the city of London itself.

 

 

We are delighted to announce that Selfie and Ur: The End of Civilization in 90 Tableaux will both play at the 2015 Worcestershire Film Festival.

Worcestershire Film Festival

The screenings will both take place on Sunday 8 November 2015, with Selfie screening at 10am and Ur screening at 3pm.

Both screenings will take place at the Worcester Arts Workshop.

Meanwhile, The New Hope will also enjoy a screening at the University of Skövde in Sweden on Thursday 22 October at 10.15am.

We are hugely excited about all of these screenings – and hope that you can make it there!

Long time no blog – for which apologies.

But there have been some interesting/exciting Beg Steal Borrow developments over the past few weeks – with even more brewing – so keep a look-out for future events, too – since there hopefully will be screenings of SelfieUr: The End of Civilization in 90 Tableaux and The New Hope to announce in the coming months, both in the UK and further afield.

The script

Let’s start with the script. William Brown’s screenplay, Kiss and Make Up, is in competition for six awards at the Oaxaca FilmFest in Mexico, which takes place 9-17 October 2015.

The script, a comedy that tells the story of a man who disguises himself as different people in order to stalk his ex-girlfriend, is one of the screenplays selected for the Global Script Challenge. And at Oaxaca, William will hopefully be meeting other writers and film people in order to be inspired.

Circle/Line shoot completed

While this blog does not constitute a final diary entry for the film per se, it is to announce that cinematographer Tom Maine and director William Brown finished shooting Circle/Line just before the end of August – and in spite of heavy rain that often made stopping people in the street for an interview next to impossible.

We did a mid-July shoot at Edgware Road, meeting in particular a couple of former students from Kingston University who are engaged in trying to do charitable work in the Middle East, before then filming in late August at Paddington, where we had a fascinating interview with a somewhat distraught and unemployed man, who feels hopeless with regard to being able to turn his life around – particularly in relation to finding a job.

There followed a rain-soaked interview Bayswater with, amongst others, a man from Sicily who talks to people about God, and a very chilled-out/relaxed guy from Australia who seemed to know the formula for happiness.

At Notting Hill Gate, we met some visitors from Germany and a student from Italy, before at High Street Kensington chatting with another German woman and a man on his way to watch the Arsenal play.

At Gloucester Road, we spoke in particular to an Argentine lady who is hoping to find a way to stay in London, a city that she feels that she loves. And at South Kensington, our final location, we chatted to two men, one French and one British, who are working on an app that is designed to help people to maximise happiness.

Given that the topic of the film is, with a hat tip to Edgar Morin and Jean Rouch’s Chronicle of a Summer, about how happy people in London are, this seemed a most appropriate interview with which to finish principle shooting. For, the final interview combined not only people also engaged in happiness, but also an Anglo-French effort to achieve it.

Now, for the edit. More news to follow when the film is ready for preliminary screenings.

The Benefit of Doubt

But, before that, Beg Steal Borrow are also set to shoot a new fiction film, The Benefit of Doubt, which retells the myth of Ariadne after she has been abandoned by Theseus in France’s Nice.

Starring En Attendant Godard lead Hannah Croft in the Ariadne role, the film will also feature performances from Beg Steal regular Nick Marwick, and Greg Rowe, who makes his second film with us after a small, but memorable role as an R2 unit in The New Hope.

Filmed in Nice, The Benefit of Doubt hopefully will also pay homage in part to Jean Vigo’s À propos de Nice, one of the great short films that was shot by Dziga Vertov’s brother, Boris Kaufman.

More news will certainly follow after the shoot, which takes place from 1st to 9th October, with Tom Maine taking up his regular duties as cinematographer, and with Andrew Slater also returning for production duties – with help from Annette Hartwell and Lucia D. Williams.

The wait is soon over!

Two screenings, one in London and one in Oxford, have been arranged for The New Hope, the film that Beg Steal and Borrow shot in Hyde Park last summer on a shoestring.

The first is a preview screening at the Whirled Cinema in Brixton, London, and which takes place on Saturday 11 July at 2pm. Spaces are limited to 75 for this, but the event is free. So if you wish to book a ticket, then please follow this link.

The second screening takes place on Monday 20 July in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre in St Anne’s College, Oxford, at 8pm. This screening is part of the annual Film-Philosophy Conference, which this year is being held in Oxford.

In principle this screening is open only to delegates at the conference, but if you happen to be in Oxford on that evening, I am sure that you could sneak in if you wanted.

The New Hope tells the story of Dennis, a man who believes himself to be Obi Wan Kenobi. An updated adaptation of the first part of Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote, the film itself tilts at the biggest windmill of them all, the myth that is the Star Wars universe, trying to show that cinema can be made not with CGI and massive budgets, but with a dustbin lid, a piece of string, and a colander. I wager my right hand that anyone watching The New Hope will find something of worth in it.

Come along to one of these and/or other screenings, and see if you agree.

Finally, it is hopeful – though not confirmed – that Selfie will also be screening at the prestigious Whitechapel Gallery in the not-too-distant future. Discussions are under way, then, to arrange a mutually convenient date.

Beg Steal Borrow is excited and proud to reveal the new poster for The New Hope.

Designed by the talented Angela Faillace, the poster shows leading characters Dennis and Hadrian silhouetted against two suns as their shadows are cast over an expanse of grass.

The poster draws its inspiration from Star Wars and in particular one of the posters for The Phantom Menace, in which a young Anakin Skywalker casts the shadow of Darth Vader, thus suggesting his shadowy destiny.

Here, however, the shadows that Dennis and Hadrian cast are, respectively, of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as in the 1955 sketch that Pablo Picasso created of the two characters for Les lettres françaises.

Blending Star Wars with Don Quixote, then, the poster conveys the key themes of the film, which is an adaptation of the first part of Miguel de Cervantes’ great novel – although in this updating of Cervantes’ story, the main character believes he is not a knight errant, but a Jedi knight.

Finally, the grassy expanse conveys the way in which the film takes place mainly in London’s Hyde Park, itself a common ground that is free for anyone to visit.

The setting in this way ties in with the democratic aspirations of the film. Not only is it a movie about a man who wishes to be a Jedi knight (thus proving that we can be whoever we want to be), but so is the movie’s zero budget a bit like tilting at the windmill of the mainstream film industry.

If one charges with enough conviction, though, maybe one can give hope to people, by showing that one does not need expensive equipment and flashy CGI to make a film, but that there is equally magic in a park, a Boris bike, a scooter, a stick and a dustbin lid.

Designer Angela Faillace is currently a student at the University of Roehampton, London, where director William Brown also teaches. She also designed the poster for Selfie, her work having caught William’s eye through the posters she designs for the Roehampton Film Society, which she also runs. Angela also worked as a crew member for Beg Steal Borrow’s video of Extradition Order’s ‘Boy in Uniform’ and can be seen in a couple of shots in Selfie.

Designed by the talented Angela Faillace.

Designed by the talented Angela Faillace.

With the finishing touches being put to The New Hope, and with Selfie and Ur: The End of Civilization in 90 Tableaux slowly beginning to be submitted to select festivals (keep your eyes open for screenings!), Beg Steal Borrow Films has moved for the first time into the world of music video direction.

William Brown directed the video for Extradition Order’s new song, ‘Boy in Uniform’ in early December 2014. The video was edited over the Christmas period, and is now just awaiting grading and a confirmation of release date from the band’s label before becoming available shortly – online and in other places, no doubt.

The clip tells the story of the band playing an illegal concert that the police disrupt. However, the music is just too seductive for the coppers, who soon find themselves seduced into having fun, rather than doing their job!

Inspired by Banksy’s famous ‘Kissing Coppers’ mural, the video features performances from Beg Steal Borrow regular Dennis Chua and first-timer Ariel Pozuelo, while Tom Maine was as usual in charge of cinematography.

Beg Steal Borrow's video for Extradition Order's 'Boy in Unifirm' takes inspiration from Banksy's famous and controversial mural, Kissing Coppers.

Beg Steal Borrow’s video for Extradition Order’s ‘Boy in Unifirm’ takes inspiration from Banksy’s famous and controversial mural, Kissing Coppers.

Beg Steal Borrow newcomer Tony Yanick acted as assistant director, while the crew was made up of Angela Faillace, Bahareh Golchin, Sara Janahi and Dasha Sevcenko.

Friends of the band acted as party goers and crowd as shooting took place in Roehampton, London on 6 December 2014.

Extradition Order consists of lead singer Alastair Harper, bassist Nick Boardman, lead guitar Jez Walton, with Radhika Aggarwal on drums and Matt Bergin on keys. For the video, the band all wore costumes inspired by the Village People.

Extradition Order‘s new album, Kennedy, is due for release in early spring 2015.